Hi introducing myself and looking for support and guidance…

My name is Phil and I experienced a mild stroke nearly 5 weeks ago. I went to bed fine,woke up next morning to my face on left hand being numb,my tongue being in the wrong place whilst trying to speak and feeling very weak down my left side…My wife rang 999 who informed us we were in a waiting queue….She rang 111 who listened as she told them my symptoms,they said the ambulance would be there in 15mins…Thing is we are travelling around the UK in our motorhome and I was having a stroke in deepest Cornwall.I think I’ve been pretty lucky with how my after symptoms are manageable.I’m walking better,speech is coming on.I have trouble eating/drinking and swallowing,I tend to choke especially when I drink and I get really tired during the day. I feel emotional/frustrated as it feels my life has changed from being able climb,walk,cycle,surf to having to sleep in the afternoons.

I’m not sure what happens next or how I move forward!

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@philrug hi Phil welcome to our forum and I am very sorry you had a stroke especially on your holidays it must have been a very big shock.

Swallowing can be sorted by the speech and language therapist I had to mix powder into my drinks (cannot remember name of it) it thickens the liquid and helps with swallowing. Also there is different techniques they will show you like turning your head when swallowing. I took this for 3 months then I managed normally for myself.

It’s a slow process and rest is needed as fatigue can make you feel unwell. I’ve had to change and adapt but found new hobbies. Lots of us SS (stroke survivors) will tell you their experiences.

All you are experiencing is normal. But is great to hear your speech and walking is improving.

Have you been to see your local stroke team or GP since you got home? Have you had a CT or MRI scan? You need to speak to a professional to see what you need to do and if any more tests are needed.

I hope you find comfort on our forum and ask anything you want someone will have an answer or supportive ear. Best regards, Loraine

Shwmae @philrug, for about six months your brain will be busy tinkering under the hood. During this time it is useful to make new connections through gentle repetition. Focus on the things that you have difficulty with and help the brain train to make the connection so you can advance but avoid the boom-bust cycle, which is when one pushes oneself too hard and the brain fails to connect. Lots of rest, as the brain does much healing during sleep. Pace yourself, set small goals. After six months, you can push yourself a little harder as the brain will have done its job and will want to get on with things, albeit, slower.

The important thing is to address each difficulty and reward yourself when you have made a little victory. Stepping stones help the brain calibrate properly and reduce residual symptoms down the track.

@philrug welcome although sorry to hear you’ve had a stroke. Must have been a bit more difficult being away from home but hopefully you got the treatment you needed ,& have been referred to your local services for ongoing therapy.
Everything you say about is normal in the early days. It’s important to rest so your brain can recover & mend. Listen to your body & be kind to yourself.
Best wishes for your ongoing recovery.

Hi @philrug , welcome to the forum we all wish we didn’t need (but are glad we found!)
Over the next few months you will probably go through the whole range of emotions but try to stay as positive as you can. It is good to have some drive to get better but you will need to also rest a lot.
It will be frustrating at times but as Rups said it is good to have small goals along the way to track your progress. There is no reason you can’t get back to a reasonable level that will enable you to do many of the things you enjoy. Don’t expect it to happen straight away and be prepared to perhaps find different ways of doing things.
Having a positive attitude and also learning to accept the new version of you will definitely help.
Good luck with you recovery and remember you can ask us for advice from our own experiences (sometimes it will be easier to understand than the doctor’s technical version :rofl:).
All the best.
Mark

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Hello Phil
I just wanted to say hello as I’m a newbie too on here. I don’t really have any advice as such but just wanted to send you my best wishes and hope you are managing as well as you can.
It’s a terrible shock to go through this. It happened to me 3 weeks ago and I’m still trying to process it all.
Take care,
Sarah

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Hi, many thanks for the supportive messages.I have come to terms with the effects of my mild stroke.I managed to get a face to face with my Dr.The fella explained that the reason for the statins was his records showed I had slightly high cholesterol,his records were from 2015!!My blood was taken at the hospital in Plymouth,they didn’t check for cholesterol!I would have thought that was the first thing to check for or I’m assuming all stroke patients are deemed to have high cholesterol.Anyway my statins are now a much lower dose which seem to work and have stopped the excruciating leg cramps.My point of this post is please check they have correct information about you….

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@philrug hi Phil thanks for that information. Why hasn’t you doctor taken your blood first and checked your levels?

I’m just having a break from my statins a week now and I feel so much better. It has a lot to answer too.though I know I’m another week they will try me in another which I’m dreading again. Lots of luck Loraine

My wife asked the dr if he should check my cholesterol before giving me something to lower if as having a mainly vegan direct would reduce levels. He said he would prescribe a statin whatever the level as they reduce risk of a stroke. He couldn’t explain how they reduce risk?!

@philrug statins do seem to be an automatic thing for those who’ve had a stroke caused by a clot. Statins lower the chance of your arteries narrowing which I guess means clots are less likely to block them thereby reducing stroke risk. That’s my non medical view. It would be usual to have your cholesterol levels checked but you’d probably be prescribed them anyway.

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