Bored witless

Bored witless is this it for us stroke survivors been struggling since all this started covid stuff I would really love to get out and about but anxiety keeps me locked

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I feel you @Mickyboy.

I was the same at first since I’m also asthmatic but then I started going for short walks in the area to get comfortable. Then it was cafés for some tea, a few restaurants, the salon to get my hair done and finally the cinema and a big shopping mall here in Edinburgh. I also managed to go to our local Aldi which is a 5 minute walk from here.

I tend to go when the places aren’t busy so I don’t get too overwhelmed.

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If you need help to get out and about see if there are any organisations that have Support Workers who can help you get out. Up until COVID IU had one to help me with my walking. They would come and pick me up and we’d go into town so I could learn how to walk among people and negotiate shops. I used a charity called United Response. They were great and would do anything I wanted. If that’s not what you want t hen there are quite a few things still on Zoom. I do several exercise classes on Zoom. So reallty you should never be bored. There are things out there if you look.

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Hi Mickyboy, have you thought about joining your local stroke group. They tend to be really sociable places and often have people who come to the group and give talks. I attend a group locally and we recently had a visit from someone who came a spoke about the tall ships which was really interesting. The stroke association should be able to give you details of your local group. Give them a try.
Ann

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Thanks for message looked and no strokes group around me

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I can fully understand your problem. I walk daily to exercise my legs and at the same time twist and turn a twig with my right hand to try and get it more flexible. I also whistle as a tongue exercise. I relied on dropping into a couple of op-shops on my walk mainly to chat with the staff, Covid restrictions put an end to this for quite a while and my speaking ability fell off very quickly. The restrictions have eased a bit now and I’m trying to make up for lost time.

Today we have drizzle and I cant get out for my walk yet, I don’t need to tell you in UK about drizzle but here in New Zealand it is not common, it either buckets down or goes away! I will have to resort to reading out loud as I’m typing just as an exercise.

Regards
Deigh

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Hi, I found a stroke support group local to me through Different Strokes. We meet on a weekly basis and I have found it to be very interesting and useful.

Regards Sue

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Horrible when we feel we have no control, which makes us more anxious. I really get what you say as I am only just up to doing 150 metres walk at the moment and I so want to do all the other things like Joy.alliy, I am so jealous :grinning:. I am going to keep going though, a little bit at a time and hope that the gnawing worry will get less. No suggestion’s as I don’t know what is right for you but I hope you talk to someone and get really listened to. The forum is really good and the support given is good, so even just needing a rant can help. Hope it goes better for you.

It is get easier @Amandaso. I was more concerned when I was walking outside back home about how people would react. But there in the UK people are a lot more understanding as disabled people aren’t locked up indoors.

At first my partner who is also my carer would accompany me for walks or drive me places. Then I told him I need to be more independent and go out on my own. It’s like allowing your child to take the bus to school on their own.

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Mickeyboy, please try to get outside. After my stroke, I was frightened of going out. The first small step was standing outside the back door for a few minutes and coming in. Then I did the same out the front door. I then walked on my frame to the front of the house next door and back. Then I added a house a day till I got to the end of the road.

The first time I was taken to a supermarket I was terrified but made it round. Then I moved from Zimmer frame to stick and gathered confidence. My first few days holiday was also frightening and bits involved being pushed in wheelchair. I now try to walk every day, even when I don’t feel like it.

I did go to an exercise group for stroke survivors but now I go to an over 60s class. We all have some limitations but do the best we can and have a good laugh together. Staying in is not good for you, so try to find a way forward that suits you.

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Thanks Joy,
That’s really the way it goes. A lot of two steps forward 1 step back, its really good to hear from people that are making progress. My partner is also my carer and he struggles with me doing stuff for myself. Have a lovely weekend.

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Hi Susan,
I think I need to do this, how do I start with Different Strokes.
Best regards
Amanda

Hi Amanda here’s their website link Different Strokes, have a browse as there will be contact details

Best wishes

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Thanks Mahoney,
will look at this.
Hope your doing ok
Amanda

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I’m doing ok today, thanks for asking Amanda, hope you’re having a good day too.

Take care

:grinning: The link was great just found an exercise group right near me. Thanks again

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That’s fantastic Amanda, enjoy your exercising :weight_lifting_man::running_woman::slightly_smiling_face:

My biggest move was the day when my wife took me to a stroke recovery class and I determined to walk home on my own. Crossing the first road was incredibly tricky, I stood for ages waiting till the road was completely clear of traffic in both directions before tentively making my move. The elation in succeeding was unbelievable.
Nowadays I 'm much more at home crossing roads, but I still do not attempt it in traffic. Fortunately over here cars are very likely to stop and wave me across.
Deigh

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