TIA advice / support

Hi,

I am 30 years old, I have a 17 month old son, a stressful job and have anxiety which has been worse lately due to work. I am currently off work following two suspected TIAs.
The first time occured at work on a Tuesday, following a particularly stressful day. I felt dizzy but not like I was going to faint, like I was on a boat and couldn’t focus my eye sight. Soon following this, I couldn’t get my words out or think straight. My BP was also high, although I suffer hypertension, which is being treated.
The second occured on early hours Sunday morning. I had had a restless night waking feeling unwell but nothing I could particularly put my finger on. About 5am, I woke feeling dizzy, but again not like I was going to faint. I had heart palpitations and according to my husband, I was slurring my words. When he tried to help me out of bed, I had next to no grip in my left hand. It felt like I had pins and needles in a left hand and left foot. Again, I had particularly high BP.
I was seen in a&e both times, and after the second episode I was admitted for observations. However, during this time I had hypotension and this caused me to feel dizzy.
I was discharged the next day, the consultant said he didn’t want to commit and say it was a TIA due to my age, but due to my history he was going to treat me as so.
I have been left with weakness in my left hand still and the fatigue is awful. I was started on aspirin and I have had an MRI which I am waiting for the results of. I have spoken to someone from the stroke charity who has been amazing, but can do no more until I get a formal diagnosis.

I feel like I am in limbo and I don’t know what to expect.
If they don’t diagnose a TIA, what else could it be?
If they do diagnose TIAs, what support should I expect?
Has anyone gone on to have successful pregnancies and births following a TIA?
What if my age means they don’t take my symptoms seriously?
Will my strength return?

Sorry for the long post and list of questions, as I say, I feel in limbo at the moment.

Hi @danielle.gowran , welcome to the forum and sorry it looks like you’ve had a TIA. I hope you get the MRI result soon so people will start taking it seriously.

I’m pleased you have found this forum so quickly as it is a great source of help and comfort and I’m sure you will get some help with your questions.

Try not to panick (though obviously not easy). Absolutely rest as much as possible and make sure you get a sick note to take the pressure of work off while you wait for any diagnosis.

I wish you all the best and hope you get some help soon.

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Thank you for your reply. Yes, I fear I have had two TIAs also but I’m in limbo till I get a confirmation.
If they say the scan shows nothing and they don’t confirm a diagnosis, where do I go form there?

Shwmae @danielle.gowran, stroke can strike at any age. A common result of young people having a stroke is medical professionals not following up a potential TIA or stroke due to thinking the person too young. I know of many young stroke survivors who experienced this. I myself one of them, had a stroke at 44 and had six TIAs misdiagnosed as BPPV. So, I am rather didactic when advising younger people who get waved aside due to age. I actually went to my GP and stated that I was worried my giddiness was being caused by lack of blood or oxygen to the brain, three months later I had a major stroke.

Your symptoms do sound a bit like cerebellar TIA due to your description of not being able to focus your eyesight and feeling like you were on a boat. However, unfortunately, cerebellar stroke symptoms mimic many other conditions, so unless you can get an MRI, the best way to judge the possibility of a cerebellar TIA having occurred is to do the cerebellar vestibular test. Ask your son to hold out his finger, then touch your nose with your own finger and move it towards his finger and touch that. Next, put the heel of one foot at the front of the toes of your other foot, now, close your eyes and count to ten. Next, in a supine position, drag the heel of one foot up the shin of the opposite leg, repeat with the other foot. Rate each test out of ten to how precise or steady you were. I think if you rate below seven, then there may be a vestibular issue and it would be worth following up as soon as possible.

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@danielle.gowran welcome to the forum. Sorry you may have had 2 TIAs. It is very stressful not knowing what is going on & waiting for a diagnosis. Hopefully the MRI results will be through soon.
Once they know what’s happened they can start you on the right treatment which should ease some of your anxieties.
If they say you haven’t had a TIA then make sure you push them to find out what’s wrong / happened. If the consultant won’t help then go to your GP.
Anxiety / stress can also cause lots of symptoms similar to some you describe. I agree with @Ingo66 that you should get signed off work until you know fir sure what’s going on. TIAs can cause fatigue & you need to allow the brain time to recover if that’s what’s happened. Your symptoms should improve if this is the case but you need to be patient.
I have heard of people going on to have children after strokes so hopefully you’ll be fine on that score.
I would hope all your symptoms will be taken seriously irrespective of age so I’d try not to worry about that.
Take 1 day at a time. Rest up & deal with the rest once you know what you’re dealing with.
Sending you my best wishes.

Ann xx

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Thank you everyone, yeah I am off work currently as I can’t drive and I use my hands for my job. I have a stress review with occupational health next week too.
The consultant mentioned migraines, but I have had these for years and they always present the same. In addition, with anxiety I have had panic attacks for years also, so I know how these affect me.
I feel whatever has happened has been caused from stress, which has raised my BP.

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Hello @danielle.gowran welcome though I’m sorry to hear you may have had TIAs, hopefully the results of the MRI will come back quickly and you’ll be given medication to reduce the risk of further TIA/stroke.

Best wishes

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