Post stroke fatigue

Hi. My husband had his stroke in October. It has affected his right side mobility and he has expressive and receptive aphasia. However, he has good and bad days. The fatigue is extreme. Even after a long full nights sleep, he feels exhausted. I’m wondering whether this is something that may improve/pass or something we will need to accept as our new normal? Any thoughts?

@hadfieldtheresa

Sorry to hear of your husbands stroke. Based on my experience it will get better but it is something that needs to be managed. I still struggle a year and a half on. If I overstep my boundaries then my fatigue starts to become an issue again.

Wishing you and your husband all the best

Alison

@hadfieldtheresa hi sorry about your husbands stroke but like @Alis has already said it gets better with time.

It’s management and getting what you can do liveable to balance what you can and cannot do, with out causing to much fatigue. I wish him lots of recovery and best wishes to you both. Loraine

@hadfieldtheresa it is still quite early in your husbands recovery yet. His fatigue should improve over time but the timefrane varies for everyone. You do have to learn to manage it - i use a diary so i can look at what triggered my fatigue. Sometimes it can be something I did 2 days ago. Sleep doesn’t make much difference to fatigue levels although I do find I sleep longer if I am fatigued. Things like watching TV, conversations etc can bring on fatigue as the brain is still active. I found I had to just sit in silence with my eyes closed when it was at its worst.
Hopefully it’ll improve soon for your husband. Best wishes.

Ann x

Aye @hadfieldtheresa, neurological fatigue seems to affect us all in different ways. The brain is just as active during sleep as it is during waking hours, so when damaged, sleep is not necessarily respite. As @Mrs5K mentioned, emptying the brain or mind-blanking can help reset it. Mindfullness and forms of meditation help do this. For me, it is repetitive tasks like rolling my socks, or preparing the evening fire that acts like a flush valve for my mind. It might be drawing, or just sitting peacefully somewhere. Sometimes listening to music can help. I now listen to the sound of a ticking clock for forty minutes, while wearing an eye mask, to reset my brain in the late afternoon.

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I too had a stroke in October and am also permanently shattered. Just doing my exercises makes me want to go to sleep again! I am just hoping it will improve with time

@Apple for the first 6 months post stroke my fatigue was awful & if I overdid it (which didn’t take much) I would be wiped out for a week. I thought it would never improve but gradually it has. Keep going it will get better…if it doesn’t start to improve after about 6 - 8 months you should see your GP to make sure there’s nithing else causing the fatigue (eg thyroid, anaemia, low B12).

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Post stroke fatigue is very common. It eases with time, but can be managed. I still nap for an hour each day at noon and I am 7 years post stroke. Resting between tasks helps, as does planning tasks and activities. If I attempt too much in one day I get both agitated and exhausted.

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@hadfieldtheresa I experienced a stroke mid December 22. It is early days for me but the fatigue is real, it doesn’t go away with sleep. I am managing to get out for walks and do jobs around the house but have learnt to rest between periods of activity. I was an extremely fit person before my stroke and find it frustrating but our brains/bodies need to repair. I hope things improve for you

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@hadfieldtheresa as the others have mentioned fatigue is different to tiredness and should ease with time and management, he’s got to pace himself, prioritise and take regular breaks between activities, life in general has to be taken at a slower pace post stroke, pushing oneself to do things just doesn’t work.

To ‘switch’ my brain off, I used to sit with an eye mask on and ear plugs in for 10 minutes or so and just concentrate on my breathing. Sitting watching TV is not relaxing for the brain, so I didn’t do that.

Best wishes

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Thank you to everyone who has replied to my comment this morning. It’s so reassuring to hear that exhaustion is a common theme and grateful for your suggestions. What a wonderful community. X

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Hi.Thanks for reply. Doubtifits anything other than stroke fatigue as had so many blood tests in hospital all of which were ok. Have got appt with GP beginning of next month so if no improvement will certainly ask him them. Thanks

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Mine didn’t fit anything else either but my GP did do a full set of bloods just to be sure. It was reassuring to know it’s purely stroke related & there was nothing else going on.

Hi Theresa - October in stroke world is like saying “yesterday”. Recovery is often slow and takes time–that doesn’t mean it won’t happen. Patience is the word. I was exhausted for a long, long time–maybe a couple of years. The brain is working overtime to do what it can and to heal and make up in other ways for what has been damaged. This is exhausting to the brain. Rest and sleep are needed. I am at the 4 - year mark now, and most of that constant exhaustion is gone. So, keep on with any rehab for your husband, keep track of his progress ( small diary), have patience and both of you get plenty of rest. :slightly_smiling_face: :heart: :heart: Jeanne

As everyone has said post stroke fatigue is so normal. In my experience is HAS got better but it’s definitely (16 months post stroke) still there but it’s much much better. It’s weird - some things are much more tiring than others. For example I can walk fairly well and a couple of miles walk doesn’t really tire me too much, but the grand-daughters’ nativity play was exhausting. I do think it’s best to take any investigations (eg blood tests with the GP) you are offered just to make sure it’s not anything else (I’ve had a couple of UTI’s which have been a real pain, literally) but it probably is just a symptom of his stroke

Fatguie can be one of the hardest to handle the only way to manage it is to plan your work load there are some good help guidelines on line. With kind regards des

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