Newbie

Hello

This will be my first post since having a Stroke (bleed on the brain) in August last year.

I have only recently started to read the posts online and have already found them to be very useful. For example - I have a driving assessment later this month and have been quite worried about it and found the recent discussion useful - so thank you for sharing.

I have lots of questions since my 6 week ‘care package’ ended, but not 100% across the etiquette of posting as yet - so please bear with me. And of course any help with the questions I have below will be much appreciated…

The whole of my left side has been affected, including my vision (I am not able to manage bright lights and have blurred vision).

I am now able to walk - with a stick - but have to concentrate hard on my balance and to make my left leg move. My left arm and hand - are still quite restricted. I have recently started to get numbness, ‘heavy’ sensations in both my leg, arm and fingers and often experience my fingers ‘dancing’ on their own at times. Assuming this is normal and part of the recovery (?), if so - how long will it take before I am back to ‘normal’ - appreciate we are all individuals - just that the last conversation I had with one of the ‘care’ team was they intimated that if after 6 months I have not as yet got my sensations back - then I may not recover fully?

I follow through on my exercises including taking short walks - daily.

My family believe I have become risk averse and suffering from anxiety and speaking to someone may help me through this (?). Do the Stoke Association team provide a professional to speak to. Looking on the site, there doesn’t appear to be a local team near by (I cannot currently drive for example)

I suppose I am at the stage where I feel a little lost, not sure what is happening to me - or indeed what the future holds.

(Just to manage peoples expectations - my Sister has helped me to type this up, due to my vision and dyslexia - so I may struggle when replying)

1 Like

@StePop good evening and welcome to the forum. Firstly I’m so sorry about your stroke. But keep walking and keep recovering. Be patient and nurture yourself. I agree with Alan his knowledge is very valuable.

I felt the same lost for a little while after seeing the stroke team for a few months I felt like my safety net had been cut. But I contacted stroke .org they are fantastic great support and a fountain of knowledge. Emma.ArmstrongClarke@stroke.org.uk

I don’t know what area you are from but here is a contact to email they can put you in the right direction hopefully.

1 Like

Hi @StePop, so sorry to hear you’ve had a stroke, good to hear you’re up for exercising and walking. It is still possible for improvement after 6 months but the gains may be slower to manifest themselves, don’t give up.

I suffer from anxiety since the stroke and am speaking to a counsellor. Your GP should be able to provide information on where you can access ‘talking therapy’ in your location, many do self referral now. It’s helping me.

Best wishes

Thank you for your post. I had a bleed on the brain six years ago and my left side was affected but my vision was okay. The first bit of advice I had was to use my left hand as much as possible. I was also told the leg improves faster than the arm and hand because it has less complex functions. Odd sensations and spasms are often signs of the brain retiring itself. When my fingers started working I found them very painful at night when they were not being used. That pain vanished in time but the hand, though useable, still lacks sensitivity.

I was also frightened of going out, but now go shopping, to exercise classes and short holidays. Going away still creates anxiety, but I go. I also walk with a stick but have to focus hard when walking. Recovery varies from individual to individual. I know I won’t be the person I was, but I remain positive and work on improving myself every day. I still have a certain amount of post stroke fatigue and have a limit on how many tasks I can do in a day. That said, I have come such a long way in six years. I cook, do a little ironing, take the wheelie bins out and can change a bed.

Others may be able to help you with counselling advice, but I wish you all the best.

@StePop Welcome to the forum & sorry to hear about your stroke. I think everyone who has a stroke looks for answers that aren’t necessarily out there. I’ve read that you make the most gains in the first few months following your stroke but I have also been told that you are likely to get back all you’re going to up to 2 years. I don’t think it is as simple as that as I think a lot depends on us as individuals and how determined we are. The only thing I would say is keep going and don’t give up. If you have a bad day don’t beat yourself up just try again the next day. I had a letter from the Stroke Association last week with a helpline number on 0303 3033 100 or email helpline@stroke.org.uk Give one of those a try they may be able to help.
Best wishes and good luck in your stroke journey.
Ann

Hi Stepop-- There have been so many good responses to your post. I really only want to emphasize one thing–six months is not an end point. I wish they wouldn’t tell us that. They told me the same thing. I worried when the 6-month point came and went that maybe that “was it” for me. I think six months was just a guide line for where-in the most dramatic improvement it seen. I am 3 1/2 years out from my stroke in August of 2018 that paralyzed my left side. I still see improvement and change. And I know it will continue. I will keep on moving, doing and learning. In fact, right about now(after 3 1/2 years) I am really beginning to feel so much better. They told me in the hospital that the leg would come back first because I needed to put weight on it to survive (walk) and the brain" knows" the importance of that for survival. I used that information to make myself do as much as I could with my left “affected” hand/arm. I would eat with my left hand, even though it was hard and slow, because I figured my brain would “see” that if I was to eat (survive) my left hand/arm better get rewired. I reached for my vitamins with my left, etc. So, I think it’s important to try to use the affected side as much as you can. I also saw a counselor for a while , and that helped with the anxiety. Hang in there and keep on “keeping on”. My best to you. :slightly_smiling_face: :heart:Jeanne

1 Like

Thank you to everyone - for all of your replies, some really helpful feedback - appreciated.

Scary to read for some, it has taken a few years to recover and for others, the road to recovery is still ongoing.
I am in my early 50’s, so praying this will help with speeding up my return to ‘normality’ (including reducing the feeling of numbness, on my left side). As for everyone I’m sure - it is the uncertainty of the unknown.

Again - thank you for your posts - and take care everyone :0)

1 Like