Fatigue

I had NO idea as to the effects of a stroke before having one - I had presumed that the physical effects were the worst and thought, when I was lucky enough to regain movement quite well that I would soon return to as I was before. I have been really surprised and disheartened at the realisation that I am likely to be tired for a long time. Last week I managed to use the second rung of the ladder to clean the window - a real achievement which I couldn’t cellebrate because I was so tired I had to go to bed. I’m trying to accept that I will feel tired but has anyone regained energy and if so how long did it take?

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@FionaB1 hi I’ve found if I do a little to much it wipes me out the next day or 2. I’m 1 year on and I can gage when it’s time to stop and listen to my body. I think if your cleaning a window maybe just 1 a day or every other day to see if you can do this task without exhausting yourself. Good luck and best wishes Loraine :blush:

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Same as Loshy, have to pace myself and then when it hits, just go and lie down
It is such a pain, so as to how long it lasts I have no idea (I am 18 moths post stroke) and still have it. Sorry I can’t give you any better news!!! Take care, Jane.

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@FionaB1 I am just 4 mths post stroke & too suffer with fatigue. I was really pleased at the weekend because I’d managed to walk a bit further than previously - still not far but progress. Then that evening I felt so poorly it took the shine off the achievement. As @Loshy says its about pacing yourself & taking plenty of rest breaks. For example I now clean one room in the house at a time and then rest. From reading lots of posts from stroke survivors fatigue seems to be a major issue & lasts a long time. I can be wiped out for a few days if I overdo it. I am currently getting help from an OT on fatigue management. Don’t know if you’re getting this? Worth asking for a referral if not. Take care xx

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Hi @FionaB1 - of course we’re all different but for me the fatigue is much less now than it was immediately after my stroke, three and a half years ago. At first it was very debilitating and I really had to pace myself, very unusual for me. I now only get the odd day where I’m ‘wiped out’.
My partner, who is incredibly supportive, thinks some of it is due to my age (I’m 64), but I can tell the difference between just feeling tired and the stroke fatigue. You will know what I mean.
I hope that your fatigue eases soon.

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Hello Fiona, the tiredness you describe is also something that I am learning to live with. Knowing that I will get tired is something I factor in when I am planning a task and even planning my day. In a way I call it ‘Condition Management’. For me, the key is allowing plenty of time to rest and not put myself under pressure to complete a task in a set time.

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Same as the others really. It was dreadful at first but is fine now so long as I pace myself and don’t overdo it. I still nap for an hour at midday.

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@FionaB1 it’s 6 months for me and as all the others have said, I have to listen to my body, rest, break the tasks down into smaller chunks and pace myself. That said I can do more now before resting, so it’s an improvement :grinning:

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I apogise if I sounded moany. I had a couple of weeks when my tiredness seemed to be getting better and then wham - I was back to a nap in the day and bed at 8pm! There doesn’t seem to be much rhyme or reason to it but I am now trying to pace myself. Fully expect to be exhausted for the next couple of days as I’ve had a really good day and been for a very scenic walk

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@FionaB1 you don’t need to apologise we all have our moments when we get frustrated and wonder why we cannot just get on with each day and tasks without suffering a set back with fatigue. I still feel like you described and I don’t know when it will stop. I know my family think I’m better and back to normal as I look better but, I know I’m not. It sometimes makes me feel I’ve aged 30 years then I have a few good days and push myself too much then bam Im back to square 1. Just treat yourself with rest and a little exercise or physical task slowly and don’t cram. I know this from experience. You are doing great, keep going we are all rooting for each other :blush: Loraine

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This is positive. When I manage to do something similar I give myself a pat on the back. It also lifts my mood even though I will need to take things quietly afterwards.

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Hi FionaB1:
I agree with everyone on this topic, fatigue is really hard to deal with. I thought as well, doing well early doors that I would recover quick, well I haven’t and it really can get me down. Then I have to remember I had a stroke and go easy on myself. Great you posted
Amanda

Hi @Amandaso - I naively thought having a stroke was a bit like breaking your leg; a few weeks and I’d be back to normal. Well, what is “normal”? The realisation that it would be a long haul was initially really hard to accept.

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No need to apologise @FionaB1, you don’t sound ’’moany’ at all, good days and bad days seem the norm. I sometimes get carried away when I’ve had a couple of good days and my energy levels are high and it lulls me into thinking I can do more, but then the fatigue hits again.

That scenic walk sounds lovely, I like to walk too :+1::grinning:

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It can be so frustrating @JSCAPM we make a little progress, then stall or go back a couple of steps.

Stay positive and keep pushing gently forward

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Wise words for us all to remember

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Hi,
I’m nearly 8 years post stroke and, like the others have said, it’s all about managing fatigue. It’s like wading through thick custard and you can’t fight it when it hits you. I don’t take long naps. 15 minutes is usually enough. I set the timer on my phone. (Just got back from the gym and sat down with my coffee and WHAM!). Up and running (figuratively speaking) again now. It’s just brain downtime and manageable.

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@FionaB1 you don’t need to apologise. The great thing about this forum is no one judges & they offer some great support.
I remember one of my friends, who also happens to be an OT specialising in brain injuries, telling me just after I had my stroke that my biggest battle would be fatigue. I thought he was daft but boy was he right. Hope you’re not too exhausted after your scenic walk - sounds lovely :sun_with_face::sun_with_face: take care xx

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Hi JSCAPM I so know what you mean. Me too expecting a full recovery and get on with it. I guess after 15 months and a lot of work I am accepting that I will never get to 100%. Kinda coming to terms with it, I also know how lucky I am to be here, best hubbie in the world and am grateful for the things I can do. Make coffee, walk to park, even if I do look drunk.:crazy_face:
Amanda

Hi Mahoney,
Only way. Hope your doing ok
Amanda

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